February 20

Barriers to creativity in the classroom

I have to say I am spending a lot of time exploring these discussions, and falling further behind… but the information and the resources are sensational.

  • Do you agree with Robinson that schools stifle creativity?
    • yes
  • As you viewed the video, what grabbed your attention about Robinson’s assertions regarding education systems and creativity?

    • if you are not prepared to be wrong you will never come up with anything original
    • educating people out of their creative capacity
    • we are educated out of creativity
    • hierarchy of subjects across the globe, and within the arts maths -> arts visual arts -> performing arts
    • so agree…. chose year 12 subjects based on what I was told I should have… sciences, should have chosen the arts
    • structure of education is shifting
    • creativity: original ideas which have value
    • different ways to be able to think… kinaesthetic etc
    • we have to rethink education
  • Do you agree with Robinson that creativity is as important as literacy and should be treated as such by school systems?
    • we need to educate their whole being!!
Creativity is vital, I think teachers have to be more able to allow these skills and way of thinking to develop and grow, rather than to be stifled. Those of us who teach in the creative arts areas are often told we need to have professional development which will improve our ability to help students to develop their literacy and numeracy in all subjects, creativity should be treated the same way, with learning opportunities provided for teachers to support them to support the students.

Barriers to creativity

This simple video infographic  details the results of a global survey of educators and parents around the globe as to what is stopping students from becoming more creative thinking. It is interesting to see both the similarities in some countries and the differences…

Key Findings

  • In all of the countries surveyed, respondents identified a lack of resources and educator restriction from straying outside the curriculum as among the top three barriers to education. (barrier)
  • In all of the countries surveyed, respondents stated that providing tools and training to educators to enable creativity as among the top three most important steps to promote and foster creativity in education. (solution)
    The study Barriers to Creativity in Education: Educators and Parents Grade the System  suggests that providing tools and training to educators is key to transforming education systems so that they promote, rather than discourage, creativity. As a professional development leader, you help to provide tools and training to the educators within your schools and campuses.
    Yes, but only because I teach in the creative/visual arts and design technology, which fosters the use of the design process and creative approaches, encouraging students to develop more than one idea…and think about why they choose the idea they do, and how they can make it work.
    In my classes as above… but getting core teachers to think outside the box is difficult, as they have curriculum they have to cover in order to report on learning standards… hmmmm
    Time, focus on results rather than the process to get there, focus of the school… not looking at curriculum restructure as much as they should.
    • What was your biggest takeaway from this week’s Creativity in Education section of the course?
    We need to encourage creative thinking in our teachers, and provide them with the strategies to embed this into their teaching… to encourage students to develop more creative approaches.
    • How can you apply what you learned about barriers to creativity in education to the work you do to train educators?
    In Australia one of the main issues was lack of resources. By encouraging other teachers to explore the tools available in the Adobe Education Exchange which has some excellent resources for the development of fostering creativity in your classroom.
    There are some excellent tools on Creativity in the classroom… how to here at the Adobe Education Exchange:

    Explore Creativity in Today’s Classroom: Learn why creativity is important in today’s classroom, assess your creativity readiness, and grow your creativity level.

February 15

Week 2 Round up Adobe train the trainer

What a way to play catch up… a great week, and all making sense, clicking into place.

Beginning with Adobe 101, we looked at a video showcasing exactly what it is Adobe does and what it can do for educators and students.

Adobe and Creativity

My forum reflection:”Loving getting back into my Adobe love…. I feel like I have been a bit disconnected… I am needing to catch up with my tech to get the Creative Cloud installed.Biggest takeaway … the awesome support and FREE and useable/mashable/shareable resources available… it really does make it easy for a trainer to get those not so confident with the products to see it as something they can use.

The resources I think I will find most useful are the tutorial sites… loved the idea of having each participant explore a tutorial or element and bringing it back. The self paced workshops are great for holidays etc… as timing in a global community is always going to be tricky so you do have to be committed to participate in the collaborative journeys… not for the faint hearted!”Creativity in Education began with a look at Sir Ken Robinson, and one of his many discussions on this subjects.

  • How do you define creativity?

Thinking outside the box…trying new approaches, not being limited by the way things have always been done.

  • How do you think creativity affects student learning?

Rote learning or simply learning things to get them to achieve at tests will not help students to develop independent thinking. They will need to be guided. For many it is much easier to just to what has to be done, rather than straining their thinking process to create different ideas… the number of students who have said to me…. but what is the minimum i need to do to pass, what chapter will I find the answer in? rather than exploring thier ideas and allowing themselves to learn and grow

  • How does creativity affect your personal life or professional practice?

Sometimes creativity can be a longer process, so taking time doesn’t always work well in professional life..sadly some bosses don’t like to think creatively, and the whole place begins to stagnate. I like to think creatively… I think it’s because I teach in a creative field that I am not fearful of taking a different and more adventurous route…

 

Sir Ken Robinson: creativity is a process not an event

 

My reflections: Absolutely on the same wavelength… perhaps as I have read and viewed a lot of his works… but I wrote down my reflections before watching the video, and the ability to think outside the box, come up with ideas which develop etc… He articulates it better than me, that some people do develop their creativity more readily than others is so true. I reflected that many people find it easier to just rote learn…. do what has to be done, rather than allow themselves to follow ideas and see how they develop. I teach in a creative field, but still have students asking which chapter will they find the answers in…. rather than actually exploring the question… I hate using textbooks or that reason…

 

Clearly the students who are willing to try new ideas and techniques will be able to come up with more creative output…. the use of creative tools like the Adobe suite also requires skill, knowledge and control. Skill in being able to manipulate the range of tools using a range of techniques, knowledge of what the tools can do and control of knowing when they have done enough…. Imagination is being able to “see” what you want to create.

 

” What a great insight. Yes yes yes…. of course allowing students to be successful by showing you what they know in different ways will begin to foster a much more positive approach to learning, and the student will want to learn more and do more. I agree, students who don’t do well in standardized testing quickly begin to think they are dumb, and not able to learn. When given the opportunity to show what they know in different ways… wow… they can blossom.
It can take a while for students who are used to standardized testing, and lock step learning to engage in the freedom of learning in a more creative way. When they do get it the classroom is buzzing… and my heart sings to see so many “a ha” moments. My classes are often noisy and alive … I love it!!
With adults it can depend on the time of day (end of the working day PD time meetings… argh) and the nature of the task (intrinsic/extrinsic motivation), but generally when they let go of what they are used to doing and ways of learning, they too develop deeper learning. The skills and knowledge they develop when thinking and learning creatively definitely creates memorable learning experiences and deeper learning.
Professional Development Design continued to discuss Knowles 6 assumptions of adult learning, and compared it with constructivist approaches.
Adults bring a whole different set of skills to the PD room. The difference in ability is even wider than for a class of year 9 students. I can see that the key to developing effective PD is to indeed be the guide on the side. This allows the learners to take ownership of their learning, creating and exploring through relevant and guided tasks that inspire them.
Some students will need more structured guidance, others will feel confidant to work independently.