August 28

Creating your Digital Footprint

This week’s thoughts come from the concerns raised by a staff member when exploring the Redback Project (getting started using Web 2.0 tools), and starting to have to put information online.
“How much is safe?”
“Who will see what I post?”
“I don’t want to share so much of myself with the whole world”.

Try Googling your name – what do you come up with? I used to just get me, but now there is some person in Tennessee on Facebook with my name… hmmmmmm, however, if I Google “Starnott” I get mostly my own posted stuff – in fact the first 4 pages, and only one random one on page 5 – I did come across stuff I had forgotten doing, which was helpful.

Check out the sorts of information you may already be sharing Your Digital Footprint

How much is enough?, and will you be opening yourself up for identity theft? are very real issues which one should consider when venturing into the online world. The amount of information about you is called a digital footprint. How large you make this footprint is entirely up to you, as is the type of information you share and with whom you share it. The bottom line is no matter what level of information you share you need to be comfortable with it, never divulge more than that, and there are the obvious don’ts such as home address, phone number, credit card, license number etc. I will take you through a few points which should, hopefully, help you to make a positive digital footprint, while maintaining your security.

Creating a generic email.
When signing up for blogs, wikis, Nings and other Web 2.0 “stuff” you will be required to give a username and an email. Although it may at first appear easier to use the one email for everything, it is a good idea to keep your work or home ISP email separate and create a new web based email account for your web2.0 journey. I have always done this, just to provide some anonymity when I add my email address to various sites, as both my work and home email accounts include my fullname. You can easily create a web based email account using Google, Yahoo, Hotmail, or a host of others.
My preferred one is Google’s Gmail because of the power of the linked accounts at your fingertips.

Creating an online identity
This can be as much of you or as little of you as you care to share. I have, for most of my online eLearning sites, given myself the online name “starnott”. I know others who have used their whole name, some just a first name and others a made up name entirely. To start building your digital footprint try to use the same name, and this will become a presence you can find. A Twitter friend who uses his whole name also uses that to tag anything he posts online, so all of his information becomes linked to him, and if he has posted something online which he wants to access, and can’t remember where it was posted, a quick Google search will usually turn it up.
You can link your online name/identity with your web mail by using the same name for both.
When filling in your name on random sites I tend to play it by ear a bit, depending on the “quality/reliability” of the site I may use my real name – such as on iTunes, but for the most part I just put a letter, or a couple of letters. Date of birth is the same… you can go a year or so either way, in most cases it is just to check you are either over 13 – laws in the US state children under this age are not permitted to give certain information to web sites, or hold accounts – COPPA – or over 18
No one is going to know if you shed a couple of years, making you… 30 instead of 52…hehehe, again, just think about who may use the information, and why, as to how honest you want to be.
I wasn’t sure about Twitter when I first joined up, and chose a different name, however, I do share my blog updates and information through it, so many of my followers know “who” i am.

Passwords
Clearly these should be kept safe and private – I have a little black (well green) book where I keep all of my passwords and login details for different accounts, which is not kept anywhere near my computers. Handy for those random sites I know I have joined and can’t remember the password I may have used.

These are just some of the ways you can safely create and develop your digital footprint. If you have thoughts or other ideas, please feel free to add your comments.

We do need to think about safety, even as adults, and be aware of the information we post online to create a positive digital footprint, as well as staying safe

I hope this helps you on your journey.

September 22

OK… I have been slack

This past week has been a whirlwind…

having been offered the wonderful opportunity to become eLearning leader at a new school, which has a strong focus on the arts, and the emotional turmoil that comes with that, after having been in Langy for 21 years…

So my head has been a bit crazy…. plus a busy end of term, with Year 12 folios coming in, and now finally maybe I can take a breath…. on holidays… up at 6am to welcome the pool diggers and electricians.

It’s windy and diggy and noisy, and they have hit a pipe that wasn’t there on the plans… ughhhh… so now waiting for the plumber while they dig the rest of the pool out.

Back onto theing more eLearning…. the Redback project is going well, those who have taken up the challenge are having a ball… many way out of their comfort zone… but it’s a good thing…

I had some great feedback on the video tutes I have created, and will spend some time making more of those. I have found Jing to be really great… but a bit dodgy when trying to upload at school…. thank goodness for mobile broadband…

welll I better go and organise things… still just flitting around…

September 7

Web 2.0 Success

Just a quickie post…

Friday session 4 (we have 4 session days, so last thing Friday afternoon) class of 25 eager year 7s eager and enthusiastic, and so good as we worked through dramas last week with PBwiki being blocked… they all were able to get on this week, got straight into editing and personalising their ePortfolios.

Then we introduced the voki… weren’t sure if it would work… and it did… not blocked… and the kids loved it… we had skeletons, animals etc having a ball. The were not even perterbed when they couldn’t hear the sound they created, or the fact they couldn’t make a voki account because they were under 13 – many US sites are having that restriction because of their COPPA legislation about what information the young ones can put online. They created introductions, and were uploading them to their portfolios to be a “guide” for the viewer. Introductiosn, learning goals, etc.

They worked through tech issues with a minimum of fuss, and it was a beautiful site to see 25 kids totally engaged in the task which was set… not one student was off task… a challenge in any computer room I think, as they escape to games or emal whenever they can…

The Education channel had PBwiki blocked for some reason… but was unblocked within a day. Success all round 🙂

And week 2 of The Redback Project is up and ready to go

September 1

cool web 2.0 tools

I had a bit of distracting fun creating my voki (see over on the side bar) on the weekend. I thought , yeah cool, a bit of fun. But…. today I was looking through some links on the Victorian Education site and saw a sensational use for the voki, where in student ePortfolios they recorded their student learning goals through their voki, and added it to their site. What a great way to engage the kids in a task they don’t often seem very interested in.

Looking forward to see if it is blocked at school…. hmmmmmmm

Also, thanks to Anne for the guides to import/export blogs, I have posted all of my stuff over on global teacher… so I wonder if I still have to repost what I post here….I guess I will find out :)… I am thinking I will just have to keep exporting etc…

and… drum roll… I have posted week 1 of the Redback Project… enjoy